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The First Skyscraper & a Strategic Blue Print for High-value Medicine

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Session
Leadership and Management

Author
Stephen Swensen
Director for Quality
Mayo Clinic

Description
Working with the metaphor of building the first skyscraper in healthcare where today there are only load-bearing masonry buildings, Dr. Swensen will present a strategic blue print for high-value medicine. He will share the practical experience at Mayo Clinic and establish the business case for a quality construct that combines four interdependent fundamentals of Culture, Infrastructure, Engineering and Execution.

Abstract
Four innovations were necessary for the creation of skyscrapers in 1885: A steel grid from which the building could hang, blast furnaces for affordable alloyed steel, safe elevators and reliable electrical plumbing pumps. Working with the metaphor of building the first skyscraper in healthcare where today there are only load-bearing masonry buildings, Dr. Swensen will present a balanced strategic blue print for high-value medicine, focusing on the four results-oriented action fundamentals of their quality construct:

  1. Optimize the Culture for safety, outcomes, and service.
  2. Build enabling Infrastructure.
  3. Streamline coherent Engineering efforts.
  4. Deliver disciplined enduring Execution.

Successful value creation at the Mayo Clinic is grounded on their primary value: the needs of the patient come first. Mayo Clinic is an organization of 57,000 colleagues caring for patients at 15 Medical Centers with 22 hospitals in five states. Developing high-value patient-centered care starts with an unambiguous understanding by leadership that quality is a business strategy, not an expense. Practical lessons and financial results will be shared.

Demonstrated improvements will be presented in these areas:

  • Financial (Internal Rate of Return and Net Present Value).
  • Adverse events with harm.
  • Mortality rates.
  • Infection rates.
  • Medication error rates.
  • Patient satisfaction.


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