Industrial Engineer Engineering and Management Solutions at Work

January 2011    |    Volume: 43    |    Number: 1

The member magazine of the Institute of Industrial Engineers

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Hometown dreams, worldly career 

Hometown dreams, worldly career

All he really wanted to do was work for his father. Instead, Chad O. Holliday wound up with a 37-year career at DuPont, which made its name largely as a chemical company. He has served, and continues to serve, on various boards of major corporations and nonprofits that require national and international travel.
By Michael Hughes

Outsourcing done right 

Outsourcing done right

Leading firms have been adopting more sophisticated outsourcing strategies and have been outsourcing core processes such as design, engineering, manufacturing and marketing. These organizations have benefited greatly from accessing the specialist capabilities of suppliers in a range of business processes. However, many organizations still fail to capitalize on the opportunities offered by outsourcing.
By Ronan McIvor

Better processes make good eats 

Better processes make good eats

One tool for better food quality is the reinvigorated philosophy of lean Six Sigma, which has a proven record for continuous improvement and an ability to boost processes. Unfortunately, there has been little implementation of lean Six Sigma in the food industry. But hands-on experiences and a brief lean Six Sigma case study show the possibilities for continuous quality improvement in the food industry.
By Tina Kovach and Rae Cho

The bottleneck conundrum 

The bottleneck conundrum

If you are an industrial engineer trying to make your operation lean, you must understand bottlenecks and how to manage them. One of the primary objectives of lean is to achieve smooth continuous flow of material through the process, and bottlenecks can inhibit flow, cause unnecessary inventories and prevent throughput from matching customer demand (takt). So in order to make progress toward lean goals, bottleneck resources must be identified, managed and improved.
By Peter L. King

Bringing outsiders in 

Bringing outsiders in

One of the most important lessons in business is that when you create value for your customers, you have the opportunity to capture value for your shareholders. Firms that can identify and implement strategies that achieve any of these three contributions position themselves and their customers for profitable growth.
By George F. Brown Jr. and Atlee Valentine Pope



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