Industrial Engineer Engineering and Management Solutions at Work

November 2014    |    Volume: 46    |    Number: 11

The member magazine of the Institute of Industrial Engineers

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Auto zone 

Auto zone 

A domestic automotive facility in North America needed to improve labor efficiency in its trim department area, specifically operations for the vehicle’s roof and harness zone. Officials turned to standardized work analysis to find the optimum efficiency and utilization level that could be achieved in this zone. This article details the steps that manufacturers can take during a standardized work analysis process to improve manufacturing facility labor efficiency and utilization.
By Raed El-Khalil

Making MRP work

Making MRP work 

This may sound like a search for the Holy Grail. But the requirements and problems with MRP can and have been addressed. The appropriate mathematics has been known for more than 100 years. For more than 30 years industrial engineering professors have been using it in the analysis of manufacturing systems. Software has been available in the marketplace for about 25 years, but it has not been widely adopted.
By Gregory W. Diehl and Aaron J. Armstrong

Exonerating Frederick Taylor

Exonerating Frederick Taylor 

Frederick Taylor’s 1911 paper "The Principles of Scientific Management" is accepted as the first major statement of industrial engineering. But in the century since its publication, the myth of "Taylorism" has arisen. This myth considers Taylor’s work a major cause for dehumanizing the workplace. In reality, Taylor dealt with each worker as an individual, and this article will explain how he did it.
By Jesse W. Brogan

Advancing facility planning

Advancing facility planning 

The fact is that useful facility layout technology does exist. These tools perform Richard Muther’s systematic layout planning and systematic handling analysis methods, and add analysis tools within AutoCAD that IEs need. Communication about these tools in Asia has not been effective or sufficient. This yields lower skilled IEs and less realization of the value of the IE profession.
By Robin Owens