Industrial Engineer Engineering and Management Solutions at Work

April 2014    |    Volume: 46    |    Number: 4

The member magazine of the Institute of Industrial Engineers

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Work Perfect

The day we strive for Marcus Bartlett 

Marcus Bartlett

Supervisor, paint and assembly
Koyker Manufacturing Inc.
Lennox, S.D.

I am the supervisor of the paint and assembly departments at Koyker Manufacturing Inc., a division of Sioux Steel Co. I oversee day-to-day operations of these two departments, along with assisting on projects in other areas of the facility as well as other sites. I use a lot of IE skills on a day-to-day basis. I determine scheduling for our products, work with team members to ensure they are cross-trained to assemble our different product lines, manage improvement projects, monitor inventory levels and take measures to provide a safe and healthy work environment at our facility.

We are a manufacturing facility with an emphasis on agricultural products. Sioux Steel Co. comprises six different divisions focusing on grain handling and storage and livestock products. We produce everything from front-end tractor loaders to a grain bin capable of holding more than 1 million bushels to hoop buildings able to cover two football fields. We recently developed a grain bin sweep that can operate without anyone in the bin, a huge step in safety. Last year, there were more reported fatalities because of grain entrapments than any year on record. The vast majority of our customers are farm equipment dealerships and large grain handling facilities. Currently the largest bin we make a sweep for is 105 feet in diameter.

The best part of my job is when I can teach a principle or process I learned in my education to one of my fellow supervisors or team members. I like passing on experiences and helping my team members become more educated and well-rounded.

A perfect day is when roughly 85 percent of the day goes as planned. Any more than that and there would be no need for problem-solving skills and my job definitely would be boring. I still would have time, however, to work on continuous improvement projects and setting new goals for myself and my departments to make ourselves better.

I enjoy working for the Sioux Steel Co. and would like to advance to an operations manager in one of our facilities as my career matures.

– Interview by David Brandt

David Brandt is the Web managing editor for IIE.