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Z94.11 MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

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BACKLASH. Free play in a power transmission system such as a gear train, resulting in a characteristic form of hysteresis.

BACKWARD SCHEDULING. A scheduling technique where the schedule is computed starting with the due date for the order and working backward to determine the required start date. (See FORWARD SCHEDULING.)

BALANCING. In the Toyota Production System, the coordination of manufacturing and subassembly cells in producing the daily quantity demanded by final assembly.

BANG-BANG CONTROL. Control achieved by a command to the actuator that any time tells it either to operate in one direction or the other with maximum energy.

BANG-BANG-OFF CONTROL. Control achieved by a command to the actuator which at any time tells it either to operate in one direction or the other with maximum energy or to do nothing.

BASE. (1) The platform or structure to which a robot err is attached. (2) The end of a kinematic chain of arm links and joints opposite to that which grasps or processes external objects.

BATCH MANUFACTURING. The production of parts in discrete runs, or batches. Bateh operations can be inter spersed with other production operations or runs of other parts.

BATCH PRODUCTION. Non-continuous processing of unlike parts. Contrast with mass production.

BIT. An acronym for binary digit; the smallest unit of information in the binary numbering system, represented by the digits 0 and 1.

BLANK. A raw material piece, ready for a subsequent operation.

BLANKET ROUTING. A routing that lists a group of operations needed to produce a family of items. The items may have small differences in size, but they use the same sequence of operations. Specific times or tools for each individual item can be included. (See GROUP TECHNOLOGY).

BOTTLENECK. A facility, process, department, etc., that limits production capacity. For example, a machine or work center where jobs arrive faster than they leave.

BUFFER. A temporary storage in front of or following a process or work station.

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